FAQ

» What is Copper Cabling
»  What is Wireless N Series »  What do mean by ADSL Connection
»  What is ADSL 2+ »  Wi - Max
»  Who sets the standards for wiring »  Who sets the standards for LAN wiring
»  Who sets the RS232 standards »  What is a EIA/TIA 574 (Hint: its got 9 pins)
»  What is a EIA/TIA 574 (Hint: its got 9 pins) »  What is category 5 (or Category 5e) cabling.
»  What is EIA/TIA 568A and 568B wiring »  Can I use a DB25 connector for V.35 connections
»  Is there a difference between telephone wiring and LAN wiring »  What is the difference between RS232 and RS232C
»  What is RS232D »  What is an 8 Position Modular Connector and does it differ from a RJ45
»  Can I run a LAN and telephones on the same LAN cable. »  Do I have to connect all 8 wires of a LAN cable.
»  Does it really matter which pairs I use. »  Whats the difference between 100base-T4 and 100base-TX.
»  Why use a rack for small installations? »  Why should all cabling be tested?
»  When is fiber optics a consideration?

Who sets the standards for wiring

LAN Cable standards are set by TIA/EIA (Telecommunications Industry Association/Electronics Industries alliance) (or EIA/TIA depends on whose web site you are on) e.g. Category 5 (a.k.a cat5 cat5e etc.). LAN connections/pinouts are defined by IEEE 802.3u. Telephone wiring standards are defined by TIA/EIA (Universal Service Order Code) (e.g. RJ48)

Who sets the standards for LAN wiring

LAN Cable standards are set by TIA/EIA (or EIA/TIA it depends on whose web site you are on as to which way round these initials are written!) e.g. Category 5 (a.k.a cat5 cat5e etc.). LAN connections/pinouts are defined by IEEE 802.3u.

Who sets the RS232 standards

RS232 standards are defined by the EIA/TIA.

What is category 5 (or Category 5e or Category 6) cabling.

Category 5 UTP (Unshielded Twisted Pair) cable is defined by the EIA/TIA for use with 10 and 100 MB LANs (10baseT and 100baseT) as specification number EIA/TIA-568A. Category 5e is a slightly improved specification published as EIA/TIA-568A-A-5. Category 6 is defined by EIA/TAI-568-B.2-1.
    

Does it really matter which pairs I use.

Technically No. BUT you have non standard wiring. This might not seem important in the rush to fix to-days's problem but in six months time when you come to do some more work and cannot for the life of you remember your non-standard kluge you may think differently about standards. Standards are not a straight-jacket - they are there to give you the freedom to forget the problem. Ignore them at your peril.

What is EIA/TIA 568A and 568B wiring

EIA/TIA 568A and 568B are two wiring methods used to indicate which colors are assigned to which pin of the modular jack

Can I use a DB25 connector for V.35 connections

V.35 (which no longer exists as a ITU standard - replaced by V.10/V.11) was specified to use a 37 pin connector (the chunkiest in the world). Nowadays for high speed serial connections (that use the term V.35) most manufacturers use a DB25 connector but may use a non-standard pinout. Check with the manufacturer. Here is the EIA/TIA RS-530-A standard balanced connection pinout for the DB25.


Is there a difference between telephone wiring and LAN wiring
      
Yes there is. Primarily do do with the way pairs are allocated in the cables (see our primer for an explanation).


 What is the difference between RS232 and RS232C

RS232 defines the electrical and physical standard. RS232C indicates it is wired using a DB25 connector (pinout diagram) rather       than a DB9 (TIA 574) or an RJ45 (oops.. should say 8 Position Modular Connector) (RS232D).

What is RS232D

RS232D is the name for an RS232 connection wired using a RJ45 jack

What is an 8 Position Modular Connector and does it differ from a RJ45
      
An 8 Position Modular Connector is more commonly, but erroneously, called (certainly by we mere mortals) an RJ45.

Can I run a LAN and telephones on the same LAN cable.

Depends. If you are using 100Base-T4 standards - that is you want to use cat 3, 4 or 5 cables ALL 4 PAIRS (8 wires) ARE REQUIRED. If you are using 100Base-TX (category 5 or 5e cables only) or 10Base-T the wires numbered 4 and 5 (one pair) and 7 and 8 (another pair) are not used in normal LAN operation but should still be connected since some equipment may use them for special purposes (we use them for power-over-ethernet in special applications). The spare pairs can be used for telephony - each pair will carry a single analog line so a cat 5/5e cable can carry 1 LAN (10 or 100 MB) and two telephone lines. However you are taking a RISK that in the future some genius may invent a fantastic application for one or more of these pairs and you may have to re-wire. Whether you consider this a high or low risk is a personal decision.

Do I have to connect all 8 wires of a LAN cable.

If you are using 100Base-T4 standards - that is you want to use cat 3, 4 or 5 cables ALL 4 PAIRS (8 wires) ARE REQUIRED. If you are using 100Base-TX (category 5 or 5e cables only) or 10Base-T the wires numbered 4 and 5 (one pair) and 7 and 8 (another pair) are not used in normal LAN operation but should still be connected since some equipment may use them for special purposes (we use them for power-over-ethernet in certain applications). They can be used for other functions e.g. telephony see above. Beware: You are taking a RISK that in the future some genius may invent a fantastic application for one or more of these pairs and you may have to re-wire. Whether you consider this a high or low risk is a personal decision.

Whats the difference between 100base-T4 and 100base-TX.

100base-T4 wiring uses all 4 pairs (8 wires) and allows for the use of Cat 3, Cat 4 OR cat 5(e) cables. If you have ANY Cat 3 or Cat 4 cabling in your network you MUST use this standard. Most telephony cables (including 25, 50 or 100 pairs) are rated Cat 3. If your LAN uses these cables ANYWHERE you must use 100base-T4 wiring . 100base-TX wiring uses only 2 pairs (4 wires) but can only be used with Cat 5, Cat 5e or higher cables.

 Why use a rack for small installations?

Even a simple wall mount rack provides a location to mount your active hardware (hubs, switches, modems, routers, etc.), as well as the patch panel and cable management. This keeps all the cabling and equipment neat, protected, and easy to access in one convenient location.

 Why should all cabling be tested?

Every cable, whether a new installation or a move from another location, should be tested according to the appropriate TIA standards to ensure proper functionality for today's applications, as well as for future requirements.

When is fiber optics a consideration?

Fiber optics may be a viable option in many instances. First, for distance purposes, since Category 5 copper cable has a distance limitation of 90 metres. Secondly, fiber optics is immune to electromagnetic interference due to the fact that it carries only light, and no electrical impulses. Depending on where the cable is to be installed, electrical influences may be a factor. And thirdly, it may be considered in situations requiring increased bandwidth. Fiber optic cable has much greater capacity than copper cable in terms of speed and complexity of communications transmission.

What is wireless N series ?

Wireless-N products were specifically engineered for growing businesses like yours. Utilizing draft 802.11n (Wireless-N) and Multiple-In/Multiple-Out (MIMO) antenna array technologies, they feature the fastest speeds that now exceed 100Mbps Ethernet it support up to 300Mbps speed and indoor 75m & 300m in out door. Wireless-N and MIMO provide a substantial increase in indoor wireless coverage, so “dead spots” in your building can be eliminated and all your employees can stay connected to the network and to each other. Wireless-N is also backwards compatible with your legacy 802.11b and 802.11g devices.
  
What do you mean by ADSL connection ?

Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) is a form of DSL, a data communications technology that enables faster data transmission over copper telephone lines than a conventional voiceband modem can provide. It does this by utilizing frequencies that are not used by a voice telephone call. A splitter - or microfilter - allows a single telephone connection to be used for both ADSL service and voice calls at the same time. Because phone lines vary in quality and were not originally engineered with ADSL in mind, it can generally only be used over short distances, typically less than 3mi (5 km).

At the telephone exchange the line generally terminates at a DSLAM where another frequency splitter separates the voice band signal for the conventional phone network. Data carried by the ADSL is typically routed over the telephone company's data network and eventually reaches a conventional internet network. In the UK under British Telecom the data network in question is its ATM network which in turn sends it to it's IP network IP Colossus.


What is ADSL 2+ ?

ADSL2+ extends the capability of basic ADSL by doubling the number of downstream bits. The data rates can be as high as 24Mbit/s downstream and 1 Mbit/s upstream depending on the distance from the DSLAM to the customer's home. ADSL2+ is capable of doubling the frequency band of typical ADSL connections from 1.1 MHz to 2.2 MHz. This doubles the downstream data rates of the previous ADSL2 standard of up to 12 Mbit/s, but like the previous standards will degrade from its peak bitrate after a certain distance.


Wi - Max ?

WiMAX, the Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access, is a telecommunications technology aimed at providing wireless data over long distances in a variety of ways, from point-to-point links to full mobile cellular type access. It is based on the IEEE 802.16 standard, which is also called WirelessMAN. WiMAX allows a user, for example, to browse the Internet on a laptop computer without physically connecting the laptop to a router, hub or switch via an Ethernet cable. The name WiMAX was created by the WiMAX Forum, which was formed in June 2001 to promote conformance and interoperability of the standard. The forum describes WiMAX as "a standards-based technology enabling the delivery of last mile wireless broadband access as an alternative to cable and DSL."